Responsive Web Design




RESPONSIVE WEB DESIGN






There are three main routes that customers can choose to take in regards to how their website functions: Adaptive web design, Responsive web design or entirely separate mobile sites. Each have their advantages and disadvantages, and its a complicated choice as to which makes more sense for developers to use.

Separate mobile sites redirect the user to a different URL when the sites detects they are on a mobile. These mobile sites are entirely separate, with different layout and URLs, but they function similarly to the main page. They may offer similar, less, more or completely different options than the main site.

Adaptive web design fixes features on a site one-by-one in response to what device you are accessing the site with. There are several approaches to adaptive sites. They can replace certain elements (such as replacing a large menu bar with a smaller drop-down menu,) add elements (such as inserting a GPS or phone button that wouldn’t work on a desktop,) take away features and content (that might seem extraneous for the mobile site) or swap elements around in other ways beneficial to the device it is being accessed on. A common adaptive change is for the images and content to be replaced with smaller images when the detected screen size is smaller.



res2




res1




Responsive web design is when every element of the entire main website is designed to resize and reorganize correctly based on the browser window size (or other defining factor) through which it is being accessed. This way, it’s the same site on both an iPhone or a desktop. It is made to prioritize important parts of the site, organising them in the forefront as the site elements change layout/spacing/size to neatly fit whatever browser size it’s being accessed on- which includes anything from desktops, to tablets, to mobile screens. Instead of swapping out elements for different mobile elements, like adaptive design, it simply takes the same page and rearranges it, using a fluid grid. Changing the browser window’s size on a desktop screen demonstrates this effect, as the elements rearranges and slide around fluidly in responsive to the size of the window. Technically, responsive web design is a subset of adaptive web design, but is more recent and more complex.




One crucial concept when it comes to choosing what kind of mobile site to use is that of “content parity.” Content parity is the idea that users should not be at a advantage depending on what device they are using to browse. The same content should be available across all platforms, and no pages should end with error messages reading. ” This concept not available on mobile.” In regards to this, responsive web design has the advantage. It’s a way to have the mobile and full -sized sites have all the same content, and have no discrepancies between them. Because its the same elements, getting resized and moved around, it’s almost the same experience from device to device. However, responsive design has its flaws too. Due to the complex nature of it, it takes a lot more time, money and hard work to create a responsive design–because in doing it , the entire main website has to essentially be redesigned . In addition, its complex nature means there is a lot of room for error. It is not uncommon for navigation bars or images to scale or move incorrectly on responsive websites. Another issue is that responsive web design is harder to explain to clients, since they are much more complicated than static websites of which most people are knowledgeable.


res3

Features

Less Effort


No Redirects

Statics


Smooth User Experience

Mobile Segment


Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

User Friendly website


Less Maintenance



Lets Get Started
your project

We will help you to achieve your goals and to grow your business.

Contact Sales